GOING TO THE CINEMA ALONE + GONE GIRL REVIEW

POSSIBLE SLIGHT SPOILERS AHEAD-

I went to the cinema alone today.

When I tell people this it usually surprises them. “You went to the cinema alone?!” ‘How sad,’ they probably think inwardly.

In fact I think it’s sadder that, for some reason, going to the cinema alone is some sort of social faux pas where you’re seen as a loner or just an all round freak in general (which I am but that’s beside the point.) I mean, 1. Why would you hold yourself back from doing things you want to do, or in this case, seeing movies you want to see, just because you have no one to go with? And as much as I think going to the movies can be a great thing to do with others, It’s also a great thing to do by yourself…I mean, it’s not like you can talk anyway (or at least you shouldn’t be!)

For the most part going to the cinema alone is fun, necessary and perfect for when you want to see Sharknado 2 but can’t bribe anyone to go along with you. I seriously recommend everyone take themselves out on a date to the movies.

So I took myself along to the cinema to see Gone Girl. I was pretty excited, I love David Fincher films, some being among my favorites of all time, (Se7en, Zodiac, Fight Club…) so that was already a tick in his favor. Rosamund Pike, playing Amy in this film, an actor I have really liked in movies before. Another tick. The only thing I wasn’t so excited about was Ben Affleck, as I have never been able to get through one of his movies for some strange reason…but it turns out, Ben wasn’t so bad after all.

But I am confused about this film. At many points throughout the movie I went through many stages of emotions, for example, ‘Uhh…what the hell is this…’ and ‘is this for real?’ But at other points, I was really enjoying myself and actually really interested at what was unfolding… I just don’t know what to make of it all.

One of the first things that confused me was the start. I swear to God in the first few scenes it was like Amy and Nick’s dialogue had been dubbed, like it had first been in a diffrent language. It was almost disorientating, and I don’t know, maybe it was just me having a moment, but whatever it was it, just didn’t feel right. It felt like I had accidentally stepped into a romantic comedy originally in a diffrent language.
Really weird.

Another thing I didn’t really like throughout the movie, was this weird Lifetime TV/romantic drama music they used throughout. And for long periods of time too…It just felt like a disconnect, and the fact that I even noticed the music just shows that it was obviously not working. It was almost laughable at points.

On a couple of occasions, some of the dialogue flickered my sexism/misogyny alarm in my head. And at other points, I wasn’t really sure what this film was trying to portray. Yes, obviously the film is trying to say that the media is powerful and can and do portray people anyway the way they want to, angels can be portrayed as murderers and murderers as angels. I think that’s an important message, and one that people really need to realize.

However, like I said, at other points I was really confused. Are they trying to say that all women are crazy? Or at least, all married women? Or maybe, all beautiful, blonde women from New York are crazy or ‘complicated’ to quote Nick himself. I really need to think it over. Part of me sees Amy as a character I’m naturally drawn to, because of course, she is fricking insane. But she is also strong minded, brave and clever, to say the least.

But then at the same time, I’m thinking, is this character a collection of male resentment towards their wives and who they have become in marriage or even the girlfriends who never wanted to be their wives? Is Amy symbolism of every mans fear and hatred for the idea of marriage and what their wives will become? I don’t know. Yet at the same time, the book and screenplay was written by a woman, Gillian Flynn, so perhaps she was trying to say something through Amy’s character that I just haven’t grasped yet.

At the end of the day, really I’m just throwing a lot of ideas out into open. But one thing I’m sure of, this film definitely made me think hard about it’s characters and what it’s really trying to say.
And I’ve really gotta give credit to any film that goes deeper than what’s on the surface.

So did you enjoy Gone Girl? Tell me in the comments what you make of it! I’m open to any new ideas…or to quote the movie,
“What are you thinking? How are you feeling? Who are you? What have we done to each other? What will we do?”

Now I think I’d better go and read the book…

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